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Since graduating from the BA (hons) Ceramic Design at Central Saint Martin School of Art in London, I created Villa Arev in 2017 in Paris.

I develop and create bright and pop ceramics in a contemporary style that is inspired by the work of Bernard Palissy, Ettore Sttsass and MarcoZanini from the Memphis group.

Arev means sun in Armenian. Villa Arev designs are filled with fresh and summery symbols in a holiday-like mood. It is a mediterranean dive.

In a few words…

Villa Arev is a joyful brand, handcrafting unique pieces

or limited editions;

objects we don’t necessarily need but which will make you terribly happy.

Crédit photo Alice Moitié

Ceramics refers to all clay-based objects that have undergone a transformation during firing.

Moulds
They are made of plaster from a modelled or sculpted prototype.

Slip Casting
The cast is the positive result, in other words, it is the opposite shape of the mould. It is made with porcelain or earthenware slip. The casting time inside the mould can take up to 30 minutes to create a membrane along the plaster.
The mould is emptied of the excess casting slip and the clay coating the mold is then allowed to dry, the mould is opened and the dried clay shape is removed. At this stage, we refer to the clay as « greenware ».

Biscuit
Biscuit firing is the first firing of the entire process. Earthenware is fired around 1020°C in 12 hours.

Underglaze and Glaze 
Colours are applied on greenware or the biscuit. 
Underglazes are made from pigments, and can be mixed with the clay. They are covered with a transparent glaze.
Glaze is the vitreous substance that serves to colour, decorate and make ceramics watertight. It can be glossy or matt, transparent, coloured or metallic.
A new firing, called the glaze firing, is needed at 980°C for earthenware, and 1300°C for porcelain or stoneware.

Luster
Ceramic luster is an overglaze used to apply gold, silver, platinum or iridescent decor. 
It is applied on surfaces which have already been glaze fired. 
Its firing is called « petit feu ». It only needs around 600°C to reveal.